Browsing Tag:

The Summer of Annah

May-December relationships between older women and younger men and why they rock!

While I wrote The Summer of Annah: A Midsummer’s Wish, I constantly questioned myself whether a May-December romance could work between an older woman and a younger man.  The book is more than a story of older an woman fantasizing about a young man. Moreover, it’s not erotica. It centers on an older woman coming to terms with her emotional scares, learning to trust her instincts, and recognizing love when it’s present in the soul of a man outside her comfort zone.

Tom Clancy is quoted as saying the difference between fiction and reality is that fiction has to make sense.

tom clancy writing quotes

Even though my novel is based in fiction, it had to make sense. Had I been writing erotica, I believe readers would have accepted the age difference. What’s not to love about a romp with a younger man between the pages of a steamy book? However, a long-term relationship? Well, even Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher failed at that endeavor.

When I met older woman, I asked their thoughts on the topic. Many told me the relationship wouldn’t work because the younger man is unable to appreciate and understand the journey the woman has traveled. In other words, the younger man lacks maturity. An older man understands the woman’s intelligence and flaws. My response–if that were true, older women would be happily wrapped in the arms of their male counterparts.

a6a90fab59a91d6156b1927976ce2dad

Dating websites, such as Match or eHarmony, demonstrate just the opposite.

According to Susan Winter, co-author of Older Women, Younger Men: New Options for Love and Romance, younger men are looking for women who “…are stable and mature. They don’t want to be mothered. They want a woman who knows who she is.”

What can a younger man bring to the table? Aside from the obvious (wink, wink) he possesses a zest for life, a desire for wisdom—an urge to dance, laugh, eat, and love. No, it’s true that not all young men are this way just as it’s true that not all clothes fit the same body. A woman has to kiss a lot of tadpoles before she’ll find one with an old soul and young heart to complement her old heart and young soul. As Kathryn Elliott, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, explains, “The key to making older women/younger man relationships work is to match voltages. Choose someone who is your voltage type–has the same level of intensity about life.”

must-love-dogs-diane lane-john cusack-romance movies
If you love dogs, he must love dogs. That just goes without saying.

Social norms indicate the older man-younger woman scenario is accepted but not the flip-side. Hollywood glorifies this perception. When it comes to older women-younger-men, well, can you say cougar? Mrs. Robinson? Elliott goes on to say women “…are victims of inner-critic contradictions. We think we should only weigh 120. We should marry people within two years of our age. We pathologize anything that isn’t within those shoulds.”

pexels-photo-104329-may december romances-dog walking-couple walking dogs-older woman younger men
Find someone who understands and shares your beliefs.

The bottom line, as I see it, is the formula, or the lack of one. No one can say what makes a relationship work and what doesn’t. However, if a woman finds a younger man who shares her core values and outlook on life, someone who will embrace the hag that lives inside of her and watch her emotional back, she has found a rare gem. Why should she turn away just because he wasn’t born when JFK was assassinated?

“Eric, I can’t do this! For goodness’ sake, you weren’t even alive when JFK was shot!” The Summer of Annah: A Midsummer’s Wish

Blessed be. :}

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 things I learned on my way to becoming a self-published author.

#1: Ice cream is therapeutic.

blueberry-vanilla-graham-greek-landing
Ice cream helps with all marketing angst.

Why my doctor would recommend I stop eating it is beyond me. Without a daily hit of Ben and Jerry, The Summer of Annah would have never been published. My recommendation for aspiring indie-publishers–stock up!

#2: A thick skin is a must.

pexels-photo-58915
It takes a thick skin to be a writer.

Everybody and her sister are going to make comments about your work. If you’re lucky enough to have a publisher buffeting the world, rock on. But for those of us who publish indie, we wear a large target on our backs. And while you’re growing that skin, learn how to roar. Because you’ll need that talent for number 3.

leo-animal-savannah-lioness-55814
I am writer; hear me roar.

#3: If you roar loud enough, some one will hear you.

Buy my book!
Is anyone listening?

How else will the world know you’ve published a book? Over 10,000 books are uploaded to to the big three: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and iBooks, each day.  (This is on a global scale but I’m still not convinced the data is correct. However, I do know that in 2014 Claude Nouget estimated that a book was uploaded to Amazon, every five minutes, 24/7.) Regardless of the numbers, there’s a whole bunch of books out there. Roar, baby, roar!

#4: Develop a marketing plan BEFORE you publish your book.

marketing plans
You need a plan to develop a good marketing plan.

You wouldn’t go to Disney World without a plan, so don’t published your book without a plan. Know ahead of time what you’re going to do and when. Nail that sucker down to the last minute and be prepared with contingency plans when things don’t work out, because, they won’t. See #1.

#5: Tweet your ass off!

Twitter for success.
Tweet until your fingers bleed.

Twitter is a great way to develop an author platform. But, and this is a big BUT, make sure you’re tweets are relevant. Tweeting about your cat barfing on your comforter has nothing to do with your book, unless the book is about locations where cats prefer to barf, then, well you get the idea.

#6: Dive in. The Facebook waters may be shark infested and full of the remains of despairing authors but at least you won’t be alone.

Facebook isn't for sissies.
Facebook is your friend!

An author page on Facebook is a must for every aspiring indie author. Why? Well, how else will you pass the time while your waiting for your book to sell?

#7: Invest money. And when you think you’ve spent enough, borrow some and invest more.

coins and money
It takes money to make money! What does that saying even mean? Jeez.

To date, my debut novel has cost me… a lot! Let’s see, there was editing, cover art, formatting, marketing, more marketing, a website, web hosting for the website, more marketing, triage for when the reviews stopped, requests for reviews, book purchases to send to reviewers, postage costs, ice cream, wine, larger clothes. The list just keeps growing. I recommend a second, third, or perhaps fourth job to help pay for your book. And the ice cream. And the wine. And the larger clothes.

#8: Find a good therapist.

alcohol-hangover-event-death-52507
Writing is hard. Marketing is hard. Thinking is hard.

Either Jack Daniels will do or someone with a degree who can help you figure out why you wanted to self-publish in the first place.

#9: Ignore the hordes of other authors pumping out books.

Wheres_Waldo_3851
Where’s the writer?

You’ll be one of millions but your book is yours. It’s unique because you wrote it. Cheer for the other authors and bless their success but stay focused on what you’ve written.  Unless you’re getting trampled by the other authors. Then, I suggest revisiting lessons #1 and #9.

#10: Be true to your calling.

improve-my-writing-skills-first-drafts-are-crap
“I know I can think of a different word than ‘walk.’ I know I can.”

Writing isn’t for everyone. It takes courage to put that pen to paper, or key the letters into a computer. Courage and tenacity. When the voices in your head refuse to speak to you, it takes a gentle hand to get them to play along. If you want to write and publish your book, stick with it. But remember, when in doubt, follow rule #1.

woman-dropped-fail-failure-ice cream-sad-crying
Never cry over dropped ice cream. Pull our your credit card and buy another cone.

Oh, and please, BUY MY BOOK!

The Summer of Annah
Enter my love story.

Blessed be.

 

Photos courtesy of Pexels.com  🙂

Turning coal into diamonds!

Many writers call their first drafts, for lack of any imagination, crap! I can only assume those writers are paraphrasing Ernest Hemingway, who once said:

“The first draft of anything is shit.”

Allow me to put Hemingway’s quote in perspective. He didn’t ball-up a sheet of paper and throw it into a blazing fire as he screamed what was to become an infamous piece of prose. He eloquently inserted it in an explanation regarding the writing process. Here’s the entire quote:

‘Don’t get discouraged because there’s a lot of mechanical work to writing. There is, and you can’t get out of it. I rewrote the first part of A Farewell to Arms at least fifty times. You’ve got to work it over. The first draft of anything is shit. When you first start to write you get all the kick and the reader gets none, but after you learn to work it’s your object to convey everything to the reader so that he remembers it not as a story he had read but something that happened to himself.’

He’s also quoted as saying, ‘There is no rule on how to write. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling rock and then blasting it out with charges.’ 

improve-my-writing-skills-first-drafts-are-crap

Remember the scene from Superman III when Superman, aka Christopher Reeves, turns a piece of fossilized carbon into a diamond?

superman

True, not the best movie in the Superman series, however, that’s not the point. The point is how does one create a lump of coal that CAN be turned into a diamond. I’ve been told by many writing coaches to not worry about my first draft. ‘Let it be shit! Get the idea out. You’ll clean it up later.’ Unfortunately, this is difficult for someone who suffers from OCD, as I do. (Okay, it’s self-diagnosed, but still…) I want my first drafts to be good. No, I want my first drafts to great!

9fec7e4596b5f598209e2376c75ca77f

And, that, my dear blog reader, is the conundrum I face each morning–a dance between my fingers wanting to type coal and my brain wanting to create diamonds.

c1e395122a327c461454a12ab901cad4-300x300

It’s often said there is no great writing, only great rewriting. This quote belongs to Justice Louis Brandeis and I love it because it gives me hope that my piece-of-coal first draft will, eventually become a diamond. If I have the perseverance of a superhero.

Just call me Superwoman.

SuperwomanLoisLane

Blessed be. :}

 

 

 

New Moons and Virtual Reality

Today was the day I planned on the paperback version of Annah hitting the virtual bookshelves of Amazon. I even arranged a celebration. Okay, in truth it wasn’t much of a celebration–a lit candle and some ice cream.

 

Sadly, the printed pages of Annah remain in Amazon limbo and the virtual paperback shelves remain empty. So, no celebrating for me. However, I still plan on eating the ice cream.

animated-icecream-cone

When Midsummer arrives, though, watch out! A Midsummer’s Wish will be a real book by then and that will be cause for a massive party. I’m calling it my Virtual Open House Launch of a Real Book  (VOHLRB), or Open House for those of you who are alphabetically challenged. We’ll have virtual music, virtual party streamers, virtual horns, virtual cupcakes, virtual laughter–the list goes on and on for virtually miles. All you’ll have to do is show up, virtually that is, and have some fun. What could be virtually easier?

youre-invited

Watch for your virtual Facebook invitation (like my page to get on the list) and bring lots of virtual friends for some really cool, really real prizes. One lucky winner will walk away, virtually of course, with a magical grand prize. I’m not giving any hints but think Thor meets Ben and Jerry. Oh baby.

hruler22

Before I leave you to go attack my confectionery delight, allow me to mention a common new moon ritual. Some people plant a seed; some plant an actual plant; some just whisper a wish or prayer–whatever your desire, having a pure and strong intent is all you need. Think it and the Universe will do the rest. That’s the power of the new moon. My desire? To see The Summer of Annah a successfully published book.

I have a second wish but that will have to wait for the next new moon. Tonight belongs to Annah. Blessed be :}

Clipart courtesy of: www.webweaver.nu

 

 

I think I can!

Have you ever read the story about the little engine that chugged up the steep hill? He kept repeating to himself (yes, he was a talking engine) ‘I think I can, I think I can, I think I can.’ He was the original self-published author.

The_Little_Engine_That_Could_thumb-231x300

For example, when a person says they think they can do something, they truly believe it! Case in point: When I say I think I can market my book The Summer of Annah, I’m implying that I believe I can do it. I believe I can tell the women (and men) in Sidney, Australia and Sacramento, California, and all the lands in between that A Midsummer’s Wish is a fabulous romantic drama. I really, really think I can do it! How, unfortunately, is the conundrum.

index

How do I tell a woman sitting in a Starbucks at the Sydney airport–a woman who happens to be searching Amazon for a book to read on her flight–that The Summer of Annah should be her choice? Or, how to I get a woman who just received a Kindle for Mother’s Day to add A Midsummer’s Wish to her reading list? How? How? How?

To help me answer the marketing conundrum question I took a self-publishing marketing course. The course could have been four weeks of intensive, thought-provoking, insightful, helpful information that laid out a marketing plan in a concise, step-by-step fashion with loads of success stories thrown-in to help fuel a desire to succeed. Or, the course could have been a waste of time and money. Ummm, I’ll take door number two for $1.00!

waste-of-time-01

Oh wait! My bad. I did learn something. I need to market myself on a daily basis!

2db9b6bb9b331f7db7e4d2595ca59f9c

I’m not sure standing in the center of town counts but it’s worth a try. Blessed be :}

Oh, and BUY MY BOOK PLEASE!

And, please, sign-up for my newsletter at tinthiaclemant.com.

 

 

 

 

#olderheroinesrock

person-woman-desk-laptop

The Romance Writers Association New England Chapter’s conference is over. All the writers have withdrawn into their collective corners to sort through the networking names they collected, write down the ideas they acquired, and, as in my case, shake their heads about their literary agent appointment and wonder, WTF!

The appointment was seven minutes in length. I prepared myself by admitting it could either be the shortest seven minutes of my life or, to date, the longest seven minutes. It fell somewhere in-between.

Although the agent was a lovely young women (young being the operative word) she proceeded to tell me there wasn’t a market for romance novels with older heroines. Really? Well, bull-oney!

Let’s go over some facts. According to the U.S. Census, between 2000 and 2010, 45 to 64 years old grew in number from 31.5 percent to 81.5 million. Since women make up over 50% of that population, that means there’s, hmmm, let me see, carry the two, move the decimal, oh geez, there’s a whole lot of woman who need older heroines!

Even young girls need older heroines. How else will they learn about strong women who can stand on their own two feet, survive and prosper–and still have hot sex?

Tweet #olderheroinesrock

Spread the word. It’s time to take back romance novels and show those youngun’s a thing or two about being a heroine. We own it!

MV5BMjE4ODQ5NTgxNl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNDkwMDgyMg@@._V1_SX640_SY720_
Sexy and smart. I want Diane Lane to play Annah in the movie version of my book. Step aside Katniss Everdeen.

Join my poll on my Facebook page. Choose and be counted. Do you want older heroines or young, inexperienced, moody, emotional, pouty heroines?

And Tweet #olderheroinesrock

Oh, yeah. It’s time to rumble. Blessed be :}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

862011370588871

Down the Marketing Rabbit Hole

Read about marketing, make notes, read about marketing, make notes, find time to write new story, read about marketing, make notes, find time to eat ice cream, read about marketing, oh dear, oh dear, I’m running out of time.

I’m channeling my inner white rabbit.

Down_the_Rabbit_Hole

I foolishly believed writing a book would be the hardest part of the journey to becoming a published author. Create a great story, get the words onto paper, struggle with dangling participles and modifiers, and, ultimately make the words flow in a manner that pulls the reader into the story. Easy as pie. (I’ll have a slice of apple, please. Extra Ben and Jerry’s vanilla ice cream. Make it three scoops.)

Don’t get me wrong. I knew having a big-time publisher accepting my humble novel was a shot in a very dark, very long, very large tunnel so I made the decision to self-publish. Seemed like a no-brainer to me. Hey kid, don’t drink that!

Yup. Just like poor Alice, I’m now a very tiny (did I mention I feel tiny?) author in a raging sea of other self-published authors, all scrabbling for life boats we call ‘readers’.

alice07a

How do I get my first-time, self-published author’s name out to the readers in this country? The world? Hello, can you hear me?!

The information about marketing a self-published book is overwhelming. Do this. Register for that. At times I stare in awe at all the papers littering my desk. It’s astounding the desk hasn’t collapsed under their weight. Where did I put that article on creating a marketing to-do list?

images

Mr. Caterpillar, may I have a hit on that pipe?

1book14

There are companies who will market your self-published romance novel (or any book, for that matter). Hmm, interesting. Oh, what’s this fine print? WTF! You want how much money?

1book22

Sigh. Can someone help me find my way without forcing me to take a second mortgage on my house?

image_009

Blessed be :}

Oh yes, please like my Facebook author page.

Photos: http://conradaskland.com/blog/alice-in-wonderland-illustrations/

Thoughts on marketing my debut romance novel, The Summer of Annah.

table-mug-live
https://visualhunt.com/photo/3458/

By definition, self-publishing is when an author publishes her (or his) own work. I first self-published at the young age of seven. I stapled together the pages of a love story I had written and presented the book to my mother as a gift. Ta da! In the hands of my audience. Self-published and marketed in one step!

I wish I could write it was still that easy. According to an article in Publisher’s Weekly, “self-published books now represent 31% of e-book sales on Amazon’s Kindle Store.”  Considering that Amazon sells a heck of a lot of e-books 31% translates into a massive amount of self-published e-books.

Sooo, how does a self-published author, with only one romance book under her belt, get found in that vast ocean of books? It’s called marketing and it’s equivalent to swimming in an ocean while expecting the Coast Guard to find me. Without giving them coordinates. While wearing clothing that makes me invisible. At night. During a hurricane. In the winter. (Are you getting the picture?)

Photo credit: bibliothequedetoulouse via Visual hunt / No known copyright restrictions
Photo credit: bibliothequedetoulouse via Visual hunt

Sigh. Stay tuned as I attempt to swim the waters called marketing a self-published book. Oh yes, and please pre-order my book, The Summer of Annah: A Midsummer’s Wish, on Amazon.

Blessed be 🙂

Plus ‘like’ me on Facebook!